Categories
News / Announcements

Dark Room Ballet Introductory Classes for Blind and Visually Impaired Students — New Cycle Begins Saturday, April 9th

Beginning Saturday, April 9 from 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM (Eastern / New York Time)   


NOTE: This class is designed specifically for the educational needs of blind and visually impaired people.

This is a FREE class!

Hosted by Movement Research, Dark Room Ballet classes are designed specifically for the educational needs of blind and visually impaired people.

About Saturday Introductory Level Class:

This class is suitable for people with no prior knowledge of ballet. This repeating series of eight classes introduces students to the most common ballet vocabulary that they would need to know in order to participate in Open Level Dark Room Ballet Class. The class introduces students to necessary anatomical concepts like turnout, torso stability, foot sensitivity and mobility, sightless balancing, and the use of a taped floor for orientation.

Classes take place each Saturday online via the Zoom platform; there is also the option to call in via phone.

Register:

To register, email: info@darkroomballet.com

You can also reach Dark Room Ballet by phone at (929) 367-0025


  • If you are a blind or visually impaired individual interested in learning ballet remotely, please get in touch before April 9, so you can be registered for this class. If you have already contacted us, we will get back to you as soon as we can!
    If you have some ballet experience, you may also qualify to join the ongoing Dark Room Ballet: Open Level Class on Monday nights; please contact us if you are interested.
  • Returning students are welcome to re-join intro level classes, as well as encouraged to join Dark Room Ballet: Open Level Class. Please let us know if you would like to re-join intro class as a returning student.
  • If you work with an organization that serves blind or visually impaired people, please share this information with people who may be interested in registering for this class.
  • If you are NOT a blind or visually impaired student, you may qualify to join the ongoing Dark Room Ballet: Open Level Class on Monday nights on a select basis; please get in touch with us to explain your interest.

Other Classes in the Dark Room

In addition to online Introductory and Open Level ballet classes for blind and visually impaired adults, Krishna often teaches workshops on related topics open to everyone, including anatomy, improvisation and audio description.

New workshop information will be available soon for upcoming summer and fall workshops; here are links to information on past online workshops: Dark Room Ballet Workshops

Categories
News / Announcements

COMING SOON: No Diagram Anatomy for Dancers in the Dark Room (March 19 and March 26)

Sponsored by Movement Research, these two workshops are a continuation of and makeup dates for workshops held last year in the anatomy series.

Like all current Dark Room Ballet classes, these workshops:

  • Will take place virtually using Zoom
  • Prioritize the educational needs of blind and visually impaired adults
  • Are free, especially for blind and visually impaired students
  • Are taught by Krishna Washburn, a blind professional dancer and dance teacher

Workshop dates:

  • The Complete Lower Body: from the soles of the feet to pelvis — Saturday, March 19 from 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM (Eastern / New York Time)
    The Complete Upper Body: from the fingertips to the crown — Saturday, March 26 from 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM (Eastern / New York Time)

You can participate in either or both workshops.

Our instructor Krishna says of the workshops:

These two workshops are meant to help participants cultivate deep levels of body awareness, to get to know and appreciate the unique features of their own anatomy, and to feel movement in a highly specific way that can then be described verbally (self-audio description). These workshops are an invitation to disabled dancers, especially blind and visually impaired dancers, who may have been denied important information about their own bodies, or who have been discouraged from trusting their own physical perceptions, to find certainty, confidence, and joy in movement. 

These two workshops are not fine-grain scientific anatomical analysis, but workshops that do deep dives regarding sensing highly specific anatomy on more targeted regions of the body will be coming up later this year (June: Pelvis, August: Foot, November: Neck)

To register:

Please write to: info@darkrooomballet.com

Please let us know which workshop you would like to attend…

If you are not blind or visually impaired, please let us know why you would like to attend these workshops…

If you are a current or returning Dark Room Ballet student who has already registered, you don’t have to write, but you can if you want to!

Please note:

These workshops are separate from Dark Room Ballet Introductory Level ballet classes for blind and visually impaired adults (which begin again on Saturday, April 9th) and Dark Room Ballet Open Level classes, which are ongoing and open for registration; please let us know if you are interested in either class so we can learn more about you as a potential new student.

Categories
News / Announcements

WORKSHOP: Self Audio-Description and the Motor Neuron: Learning How to Play Your Own Instrument, Wed. February 16th from 6 PM to 7 PM (Eastern Time)

Krishna Washburn of Dark Room Ballet will be sharing one of her popular anatomy and audio description workshops, this time sponsored by Hook & Loop out of Philadelphia (not Movement Research in NYC).

The Dark Room Ballet community and friends are invited — if you have participated in a version of this workshop before, please feel free to join again!

The workshop is free and will take place online; you must register directly with Hook & Loop to receive the Zoom information and recording after the event.

Description and RSVP link below.

Self Audio-Description and the Motor Neuron: Learning How to Play Your Own Instrument

Wednesday February 16th, 2022

6:00 PM to 7:00 PM, Eastern Time


Facilitated by Krishna Washburn
Closed Captioning available

This workshop helps people to begin developing a self-audio description practice, in order to create movement art that connects with others on a visceral level. This workshop de-centers and de-prioritizes sight, and is appropriate for movers and dancers of all levels of experience or inexperience. Learn how to understand how movement feels in your body, and then practice talking about those feelings with others while also learning about the wonders of human anatomy.

By RSVP-ing you will receive the zoom link, full access information and a recording for this workshop. Recordings will be sent out by early March via Hook & Loop.

Please fill out this form to RSVP: Self Audio-Description and the Motor Neuron: Learning How to Play Your Own Instrument

Please send email to hookandloopphl@gmail.com with any questions.

Categories
News / Announcements

What Blindness Brings to Art: a conversation with blind and visually impaired movement artists

A virtual event on Friday February 4

Hook & Loop is a Philly-based accessible artist collective led by people identifying as Disabled, chronically ill, or on the disabled spectrum which create accessible spaces, creative practices and interdisciplinary events to be experienced by everyone.

As part of the “Fractals” series, Krishna Washburn will be participating in a virtual event…


Facilitated by K. Hamilton Projects via Hook & Loop:

What Blindness Brings to Art: a conversation with blind and visually impaired movement artists

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 4, 2022

2 PM to 3 PM Eastern Time (podcast screening to follow until 4 PM)

Featuring: Kayla Hamilton, Christopher Unpezverde Núñez, iele paloumpis & Krishna Washburn

Full Program Information for all events in this series: HOOK & LOOP Fractals Program

To RSVP for this event, please fill out this form and select the February 4th event: HOOK & LOOP Virtual Event Series RSVP

Categories
News / Announcements

Dark Room Ballet Introductory Classes for Blind and Visually Impaired Students — New Cycle Begins Saturday, January 22! (and other classes available)

Beginning Saturday, January 22 from 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM (Eastern / New York Time)   


NOTE: This class is designed specifically for the educational needs of blind and visually impaired people.

This is a FREE class!

Hosted by Movement Research, Dark Room Ballet classes are designed specifically for the educational needs of blind and visually impaired people.

About Saturday Introductory Level Class:

This class is suitable for people with no prior knowledge of ballet. This repeating series of eight classes introduces students to the most common ballet vocabulary that they would need to know in order to participate in Open Level Dark Room Ballet Class. The class introduces students to necessary anatomical concepts like turnout, torso stability, foot sensitivity and mobility, sightless balancing, and the use of a taped floor for orientation.

Classes take place each Saturday online via the Zoom platform; there is also the option to call in via phone.

Register:
To register, email: Dark Room Ballet: Open Level Class on Monday nights; please contact us if you are interested.

  • Returning students are welcome to re-join intro level classes, as well as encouraged to join Dark Room Ballet: Open Level Class. Please let us know if you would like to re-join intro class as a returning student.
  • If you work with an organization that serves blind or visually impaired people, please share this information with people who may be interested in registering for this class.
  • If you are NOT a blind or visually impaired student, you may qualify to join the ongoing Dark Room Ballet: Open Level Class on Monday nights on a select basis; please get in touch with us to explain your interest.
  • Other Classes in the Dark Room!

    • Saturday, March 19, 2022 and Saturday, March 26, 2022 are the make-up dates for No Diagram Anatomy for Dancers in the Dark Room, an interactive dancers’ anatomy course that de-centers sight, and will cover the complete lower body and complete upper body, respectively.

    We look forward to hearing from you soon!

    Care about audio description and supporting dance art for blind and visually impaired people? Check out Telephone and Telephone Ko-Fi.

    Categories
    News / Announcements

    Support the Telephone Film and Dark Room Ballet on #GivingTuesday!

    Cyber Monday is coming to a close, which means that tomorrow is Giving Tuesday!

    You may have heard about the Telephone Film project before. 

    If you haven’t, here is some more info:

    The first of its kind, Telephone is a work-in-progress short film bringing awareness to the important art form of audio description (AD) for dance. Audio description allows blind and visually impaired people to be included fully in the joy of artistic expression.

    Co-directed by Dark Room Ballet founder Krishna Washburn and choreographer Heather Shaw, Telephone is the first screendance film created specifically with a visually impaired audience in mind, while facilitating an immersive sensory experience for audience members of all sight levels.

    Created during the global pandemic, the film features diverse disabled and non-disabled artists from across the globe, demystifying and legitimizing AD, not just as an access tool, but as a beautiful, rich art form in its own right.

    Telephone is at the forefront of a completely new approach to audio description. Most of what is considered “best practice” for AD is meant for television or film. A neutral AD voice describes the visuals and does not express emotional content. In television and film, the performers’ voices (layered over the AD) inform the audience of the emotional themes. However, in dance, performers rarely speak. Is the neutral AD voice really the best choice for dance? How do those listening to the AD connect with the emotional content of the performance?

    The audio describers of Telephone are reshaping the world’s perception of AD, adding emotional context and allowing their words to dance in the same way a dancer’s body moves. The result is a beautiful merge of poetry and movement, proving that:

    Dance is visceral – not merely visual.

    Telephone Film is in the post-production stage, and is just $600 away from being able to meet a minimum goal to pay for editing and accessibility services.

    You can help!

    Interested in making a one-time donation? You can do so on Ko-Fi.

    Interested in Dark Room Ballet Merchandise in support of Telephone? Limited quantity tote bags* are available at the following links: Air Between My Vertebrae, Fingers Awake and Alive, and Heels like Magnets.

    Watch the Telephone film trailer (with credits and expanded description)… and then, do the Telephone Rock!

    (The Telephone Rock is a Sesame Street video from 1977 with Muppets singing in and around a telephone booth… remember those? The lyrics are available here.)

    Thanks, as always, for supporting the missions of Dark Room Ballet and the Telephone Film!

    Categories
    News / Announcements

    WORKSHOP: No Diagram Anatomy for Dancers in the Dark Room (beginning November 13)

    Dark Room Ballet presents:

    Image Description: This is a black vinyl tote bag. On the
    front of the bag, there is an orange square that frames the words in all
    caps: AIR BETWEEN MY VERTEBRAE. Right underneath the words, there is an
    image of part of a curving spine. The square, words, and spine detail
    are made of an orange, flock vinyl material that has a soft velvet,
    fuzzy feel.

    No Diagram Anatomy for Dancers in the Dark Room

    Note: Dark Room Ballet classes prioritize the educational needs of blind and visually impaired students, but anatomy workshops are open to all.

    Sponsored by Movement Research

    This is a series of 5 individual workshops held online via Zoom beginning Saturday, November 13, 2021.

    All workshops take place on Saturdays, from 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM (Eastern/New York Time)

    (no class November 27, 2021)

    Students can take the complete series of 5 classes, or attend individual sessions as fits their schedule.

    Class Description:

    1. Planes and Chains: how the body relates to space, surfaces, directions, and itself (November 13)
    2. Biomechanics 101: How every single joint in the body operates (November 20)
    3. The Spine and its Supports: when people talk about the core, this is what they mean (Rescheduled to December 11)
    4. Motor Neuron Function and Human Variation: Learning How to Play Your Own Instrument (December 18)

    Please note: The Complete Lower Body workshops have been rescheduled and will be taught in 2022.

    Dates to be announced soon.

    To register:

     email: info@darkroomballet.com

    And please let us know which/how many of the workshops you would like to participate in.

    You can also let us know more about your interest in taking classes with Dark Room Ballet.

    Please note:

    This workshop series is separate from other class offerings; please contact us if you are also interested in:



    Categories
    News / Announcements

    Gratitude in the Dark Room: A Collective Dance Improvisation with Krishna Washburn and jill sigman/thinkdance Saturday, July 3rd, 4 PM to 5:30 PM (EDT)

    SPECIAL CLASS


    [Virtual] Gratitude in the Dark Room:
    A Collective Dance Improvisation with Krishna Washburn and jill sigman/thinkdance


    Saturday, July 3
    4 PM to 5:30 PM EDT
    on Zoom

    Dark Room Ballet (sponsored by Movement Research) joins jill sigman/thinkdance in NYC to participate in a special, international collective dance improvisation initiated and conceived by Belgian dance artist, Ann Cailliau.

    On July 3, dancers in multiple locations and multiple countries will be taking time to use movement to express gratitude and connection through movement and orientation in space. jill sigman/thinkdance will be hosting a live outdoor event in Riverside Park in New York City simultaneously with this online workshop.

    No experience in improvisational dance is needed to participate. The whole event is designed for the educational needs of blind and visually impaired people, and participants are encouraged to unmute, ask questions, and self-describe throughout the event.

    Infinite gratitude for our collective wisdom, our collective knowledge!

    Register:

    To register, email: info@darkroomballet.com

    Categories
    News / Announcements

    Dark Room Ballet at CREATIVE CONVERSATIONS: DISABILITY, AGING AND ACCESSIBILITY (Thursday, June 24 at 6 PM Eastern Time)

    CREATIVE CONVERSATIONS: DISABILITY, AGING AND ACCESSIBILITY

    Thursday June 24, 6:00 PM to 7:00 PM (Eastern Time)

    sponsored by the Queens Council on the Arts

    Flyer for the event which is described right below...
    Event flyer with a photo taking up the top two thirds of the flyer and text in the bottom third. The top 2 thirds of the square shows an image of a black artist with an intellectual disability, squirting a paint bottle directly onto a canvas. With a black sweater thrown over his shoulder, brushes and bottles sit on a cart to his right, with framed colorful prints stacked vertically and neatly on a wall directly behind him. On the bottom third of the flyer, a solid yellow-orange color serves as the background for thick black lettering that reads “Creative Conversations.” Beneath this title, the subtitle reads, Disability, Aging and Accessibility, Thursday, 6.24, 6:00 – 7:30pm. Image by Daniel Tardif

    This session invites local artists and community members of all abilities to discuss issues pertaining to creative aging and disability. Worldwide, persons with disabilities represent 15% of the population; in the five boroughs, there are almost 1 million people with disabilities. Additionally, in Queens, the number of older adults has grown significantly in the last 5 years – many with limited access to cultural services.

    This session will feature the work of local artists with disabilities, including Krishna Washburn and Alejandra Ospina of Dark Room Ballet as well as representatives from Queens senior centers and the AHRC. The group will then be invited to discuss the intersectionality of aging and accessibility by exploring the following questions:

    • In what ways do the needs of persons with disabilities and seniors overlap, and in what ways do they differ?
    • What are some examples of accessible design that can benefit everyone?
    • As creators and artists, how can we be more inclusive to all communities including people with disabilities and older adults?

    This event is held in partnership with the Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities. The conversation will be moderated by Walei Sabry, Digital Accessibility Coordinator at the Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities.

    To register and join on Zoom:

    https://www.queenscouncilarts.org/calendar/2021/6/9/creative-conversations-aging-and-accessibility

    Categories
    Krishna's Thoughts News / Announcements

    Krishna writes about Dark Room Ballet and Audio Description for GIBNEY: Imagining (Issue 5, May 2021)

    This essay was originally published online in the GIBNEY: Imagining Journal (Issue 5, May 2021)

    You can listen to an audio version of the essay below (as read for Krishna by Dark Room Ballet Program Coordinator, Alejandra Ospina) via SoundCloud

    What Sounds Feel Like: Ways of Exploring Audio Description

    By Krishna Washburn

    During these strange quarantine days, I find myself in the most unexpected circumstances: confined completely to my Harlem apartment, mostly the tiny dance floor in my kitchen, unable to make any kind of physical contact with anyone, and yet, suddenly quite famous. I think it was the USA Today article that really changed things: suddenly, I was being approached by radio podcasts, magazines, news programs, all sorts of media outlets, and my email inbox was spilling over with messages from people who wanted to study with me.

    And who am I? 

    I like to characterize myself as a crazy blind lady dancing by herself in her kitchen. While this description is accurate, I ought to think about the reasons why I choose to use these words, which reveal a desire not to take myself too seriously, but also might reveal the scars of trying to be taken seriously as an artist in an ableist world.

    The last few months aside, I have spent most of my career as an artist fighting for any and all kinds of scraps: opportunities to perform, maybe in exploitative work, maybe in respectful work; opportunities to make professional connections, maybe with people who share my philosophies, maybe with people who think of me in ways that I find degrading; opportunities to make a little bit of money here and there, never enough, just anything; opportunities to teach, to use my hard-earned Masters of Education degree, my extensive study of biomechanics, and thirty-six years of classical ballet training. If I managed to grab hold of any of these things in any quantity, I knew that I needed to feel grateful, because chances like these for artists like me were few and far between, chances for blind artists. I learned to not ask for too much, I learned to swallow my pride, especially when all I really wanted was to beg for someone, anyone, to just talk to me.

    At its most basic form, audio description is someone talking to you, using a voice and some words, to tell you what your eyes cannot. As performing arts venues have started to consider accessibility for disabled audiences, audio description has become a topic of some interest in the arts. The question sometimes arises: what is the best practice for audio description? Panels of intelligent people with extensive knowledge of performing arts theory discuss this question. Whether they come to any resolution, I could not say, considering that I have never been invited to be part of a panel like that. 

    What I do know, though, is what the audio description services are like when I attend a performance, whether live or digital. Usually, I find much to be desired, but I have been trained to smile and feel grateful that anyone offered me a headset at all.

    Quite a few years ago, a friend had a ticket for a performance of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater at City Center and couldn’t make it. So, I got to go in her place. I got my little headset and sat myself down in what I knew to be a very expensive seat (grand tier), but I was really very far away from the stage itself and would not be able to feel air resistance from the dancers’ movements or hear their footfalls. This program included Alvin Ailey’s Revelations, a piece I had always wanted to experience. I sat there, listening to the little voice in my ear describing diagonal pathways of movement, whether right and left arms were straight or bent, how many dancers were on stage, the colors of their costumes, in the most neutral tone of voice that a human can produce. The people sitting around me, however, were, for the most part, in tears.

    I heard people crying, laughing, crying and laughing at the same time, gasping in joy and surprise. Now, I’m not a detective, but I could tell that I was not experiencing the same performance that they were. I was getting my audio description, I was having my access need met, and I should have been grateful for that, but I didn’t feel grateful in that moment. I felt the deepest, most powerful FOMO* that any blind person could ever feel. (Note: FOMO is an acronym for Fear of Missing Out. It describes a certain kind of social anxiety that stems from the fear of being excluded from important events and activities. I believe that FOMO is in general popular use, but I know that it is heard frequently in disability community to describe the desire to participate in life, but being afraid or unsure that our access needs will be met, and that we will be left out.)

    I wanted to experience a performance that would make me respond like everyone else in the audience. I considered to myself that these folks would be remembering this performance for years, maybe the rest of their lives, and that they would remember crying in the grand tier at City Center. I also considered that they would not remember everything about the performance. I suspected that whether the dancers’ right or left arm was bent or straight was not going to be the most permanent part of their memories.

    Audio description is still a rather new field. Most of what is considered “best practice” for audio description is meant for television or film, media where the performers typically speak; actors act and emote with their voices. The neutral voice in that context sometimes makes sense: it is better to interpret the emotions of the performers based on their performances rather than through explicit description. However, in dance, performers only very rarely speak. The emotional content of their art is conveyed through movement. Is the neutral voice really the best choice in this circumstance?

    Quarantine, in its strangeness and its totality for me, an immunocompromised disabled person, has encouraged me to start asking many questions about audio description. I have spent most of my quarantine trying to establish myself as a ballet teacher. My class, Dark Room Ballet, is designed specifically for the educational needs of blind and visually impaired dance students, particularly those who have never gotten to study dance before, but who want to learn the real skill. I speak continuously and constantly through class; a Dark Room Ballet class requires me to develop a rhythmic script which requires about six or seven hours of preparation before I teach. I have this style of teaching coursing through my blood at this point: I dig my heels in before every class and I think about how every movement feels and how to express it in the most musical but most complete way possible. What I have ended up doing, interestingly, is teaching a ballet class where I never talk about what anything looks like. My students learn quickly and learn a lot, they ask me exceptionally well-formulated questions about movement, and I know that some of them are considering professional dance careers. We accomplish this as a group without ever talking about what anything looks like.

    Maybe that is the real flaw of audio description for dance, I started to wonder: the language chosen in most audio description is focused on what movement looks like, rather than what it feels like. 

    Some of my students have never had sight. They don’t have a list of visual shorthand in their memories that can tell them what a bent arm symbolizes as opposed to a straight arm. Honestly, at this point, neither do I. Perhaps only the most visceral type of audio description, the type that can activate the motor neurons in their own bodies, would be interesting to them.

    What sorts of words could do that? What tone of voice? I think it is the tone of voice that those audience members who shared the grand tier with me at City Center would have had when they shared their experience with a friend the next day: intense, passionate, deeply connected to the emotional content of the artistry. Was it an accident that two of my closest friends are audio describers of this kind? For those of you lucky enough to remember life at Gibney in the Before Times, they might have noticed that I came to many performances there, usually with either Michelle Mantione or Alejandra Ospina, or both of them, sitting next to me, whispering to me while I can barely keep my body still in my seat. 

    Maybe describing the visual component of dance is less important than the visceral when developing audio description for dance. Maybe, when we develop performances, we have trained audio describers working alongside us during our rehearsal process. Maybe–and this might be my most radical suggestion yet–artists might consider their blind audience as they develop work from the outset. Maybe dancers should be allowed to talk, to self-describe, to emote what it feels like to jump three feet into the air while they’re doing it.

    I, myself, have been creating art for blind audiences for quite some time, both in collaboration with visually impaired artists like iele paloumpis and Kayla Hamilton, but also on my own, just creating art that I think my blind and visually impaired colleagues and students will find interesting and exciting and memorable. I never say what I look like as I dance because, truthfully, I neither know nor even really care. I say what it feels like. 

    Almost as a lark, I started to work on a screen dance project with a choreographer in California named Heather Shaw. She was a rare choreographer who thought interesting audio description could actually make a dance performance better for the whole audience. I came up with an idea based on the children’s game of telephone, where dancers would film themselves while listening to an audio description track, and audio describers would describe said dance videos, and the chain could go on and on, perhaps evolving along the way, each artist taking their own spin on the expressions, different styles of movement, different styles of speaking, but all having lots of fun. The Telephone Dance and Audio Description Game, which might remain an eternal work in progress, a film that never stops collecting video and audio, is meant to welcome artists from both within and without the disability arts community into the experience of audio description, demystifying it, and legitimizing it as an art form in its own right. 

    Before I wrap up my thoughts, I want to clarify that I know that my ideas about audio description are unpopular, not only with arts institutions and dance companies, but also with members of the disability arts community. I don’t speak for every blind artist, and I don’t pretend to be able to do such a thing. I do, however, think it’s worthwhile for me to use my time to create dance performance and dance education for my fellow blind and visually impaired folks, and for me to try every possible way to change the script for audio description, to help it develop into a truly extraordinary art form, to actualize its true potential to help everyone in the audience laugh and cry at the same time together. What better way for a crazy blind lady dancing by herself in her kitchen to spend her time?